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Congratulations to Spire’s Volunteer Peer Support Team!

24 June, 2016

Spire’s volunteer peer support team was recognised at the 2016 Victorian Disability Awards for their commitment to the spinal cord injury community (SCI).

Spire was thrilled that its peer support volunteers won in the group volunteer category at the Victorian Disability Awards for 2016! During the awards ceremony, they were acknowledged for the great contribution and efforts that they make in supporting the SCI community. The award is a huge encouragement and testament to volunteer’s commitment to inspiring and supporting people with a spinal cord injury (SCI) to live life well and to pursue their personal goals.

The Victorian Disability Awards celebrate individuals, teams, businesses and organisations that make outstanding contributions to empowering people with a disability and creating an inclusive and supportive community.

"They bring an embodiment of hope into what could easily be viewed as a hopeless, helpless situation and guide people towards what they can do rather than what they can’t do.”

"Spire’s team of volunteers bring with them the unique value and perspective of the diverse possibilities of life and the enjoyment of life post-SCI."

The independent nomination read:

“Over the past four years, Spire’s team of volunteer mentors has made nearly 4,000 individual visits to people with SCI, both in hospitals as well as in the community. In addition, to direct peer support they have resourced activities which leverage the value of the lived experience with disability through regular events and activities such as; community living expos, community forums, social and leisure outings, blog and newsletter articles and regional peer support networks to support people in regional Victoria living with a SCI.

Spire’s team of volunteers bring with them the unique value and perspective of the diverse possibilities of life and the enjoyment of life post-SCI. The focus they bring to people who have recently gone through a life-changing trauma is that, despite its complexities and challenges, life with SCI can be lived well and on one’s own terms. They bring an embodiment of hope into what could easily be viewed as a hopeless, helpless situation and guide people towards what they can do rather than what they can’t do.

The 2016 Award Ceremony took place on the 15th of June at Federation Square, Melbourne and is a joint initiative between the National Disability Services and the Department of Health and Human Services.

Spire and AQA would also like to extend their congratulations to all of this year’s Victorian Disability Award recipients. To find out more or read about other category winners and nominees, visit the Department of Health and Human Services website.

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